Monday, February 20, 2017

Indian Mutiny combat account and the weapons mentioned - Sabres, tulwars, carbines, rifles, pistols


Published on Feb 14, 2017
Reciting an original close combat account with swords and firearms by Lieutenant de Kantzow, 9th Bengal Native Infantry, from the Indian Mutiny of 1857. Weapons featured are the 1853 pattern cavalry sword, an Indian tulwar, an 1845 pattern infantry officer's sword, an Indian cavalry carbine dated to 1859, an 1853 pattern Enfield rifled musket and bayonet, a French 0.72 single shot pistol, an English transitional revolver, a Beaumont-Adams revolver and a modern replica 1851 Colt London Navy by Uberti.
http://www.fioredeiliberi.org
http://www.antique-swords.co.uk

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Bhagat Singh’s gun that killed John Saunders, found after 90 years





School students have a look at a pistol with which freedom fighter Bhagat Singh had shot British police officer John Saunders in 1927. Photo:  Pravin Barnale.School students have a look at a pistol with which freedom fighter Bhagat Singh had shot British police office... Read More
Indian Freedom fighter Bhagat Singh had killed British officer John Saunders on December 17, 1928. The pistol that Bhagat Singh had used to fire the bullet killing Saunders has found after 90 years.
Indian Freedom fighter Bhagat Singh had killed British officer John Saunders on December 17, 1928. The pistol that Bhagat Singh had used to fire the bullet killing Saunders has found after 90 years and half a century of being lost in a storeroom in CSWT museum. According to reports by ToI, the .32 mm Colt automatic was sitting on public display at the Reoti firing range of the Border Security Force in Indore on Tuesday. It must be noted that it was on this very day, February 15, 1931, that the Viceroy, Lord Irwin had rejected the final mercy petition filed by Congress President Madan Mohan Malviya.
According to reports, many people saw the gun placed in a glass case on daily basis but were never aware of its significance. It was only after the museum authorities removed the black paint from the pistol and matched the serial number on it (168896) that they recognised the owner and the significance of the pistol. It has to be noted that despite his bravery and sacrifice that ultimately inspired generations, Shaheed Bhagat Singh was only declared a martyr by the central government in its records in 2012

After avenging the death of Lala Lajpat Rai, Shaheed Bhagat Singh partnered with Batukeshwar Dutt and bombed the Central Legislative Assembly while shouting the slogans for freedom and the revolution to achieve it for the country, before surrendering to the police. In jail, Bhagat Singh went on a hunger strike for 116 days to claim his rights as an Indian political prisoner. Although history books are not clear about this, certain reports suggest that Bhagat Singh had written letters to Viceroy Irwin to consider him as a prisoner of war and be executed by a firing squad. Bhagat Singh was subsequently hanged to death on March 23, 1931

Source: http://www.financialexpress.com/india-news/bhagat-singhs-gun-that-killed-john-saunders-found-after-90-years/552690/

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Oldest gun salute at Durga puja in mumbai

 Kolkata is an early riser. From the farthest east of the country to Allahabad, the sun takes two hours to travel, which is why the City of Joy, despite its sleepy legacy, is up and about when the rest of the country is still dreaming. However, it's only at this time of the year the city needs no excuses, no threats, no alarm clocks to greet the dawn. Durga Puja is here with its call of festive duty.
But, while this annual Bengali carnival sees millions milling the streets, hopping from one pandal to the next, taking in all kinds of odes to the goddess — artistic, macabre and sometimes, outlandish, there's also another, more intimate side to this festival, that quietly lingers among the misty chandeliers of the baithak-khanas, the dappled porticos and the thakur dalans of Kolkata's very ancient family homes, some of which date back to around 200 years. These are, what the Bengalis call the "bonedi baris" or homes of the aristocrats. Their antique arches, majestic pillars and grand stairways carry as much legacy as their offerings to the goddess — from the naibedya to the bhog — all of it mirroring a culture of exceptional enterprise, extravagance and an eye for detail.
At the other Daw home, Priya Mukherjee Daw, newly married into the Narasingh Chandra Daw family, oversees the preps for the bhog. The Daws being lower caste, are not allowed to touch any item that’s part of the core puja ritual. Hence, the rope separating the family bride Priya from the Brahmin cook. Pics/Rana Chakraborty
At the other Daw home, Priya Mukherjee Daw, newly married into the Narasingh Chandra Daw family, oversees the preps for the bhog. The Daws being lower caste, are not allowed to touch any item that’s part of the core puja ritual. Hence, the rope separating the family bride Priya from the Brahmin cook. Pics/Rana Chakraborty
If you could peep into their inner sanctums, you'd catch traditionally draped women sitting around mounds of coconut, jaggery and other sweet ingredients, whipping out succulent laddoos and other traditional sweets. Or, you could even spot the bhiyen — sweet-makers — stirring sugar syrup in huge, cast iron kadhais. There'd be an army of cooks and helpers peeling, chopping, kneading the dough for luchi (Bengali puri) — the constant murmur of the mortar and pestle cutting through the morning calm. Over the next few days, these lovingly tended offerings will find their way to grateful devotees, the head priest and other members of the family.
Today, in the glitz of the thematic pandals and exquisite craftsmanship of idols, these old-world pujas may have been relegated to the periphery, however, the doors of the homes of cultural elites are still open for anyone wanting to catch a glimpse of history. Long before revelry overshadowed ritual, devotees would throng to these homes to take in the splendour of the pujo as celebrated by the influential and wealthy families. What was celebrated by a handful of zamindars in the wealthier parts of Bengal, became a game of one-upmanship, with each of them trying to outdo the other in pomp and revelry. In Calcutta, it was often to woo the sahibs of the East India Company who would be guests of honour.
At the Banerjee bari, Meenakshi Banerjee puts a gold and pearl necklace on the idol before the Shashti evening puja
At the Banerjee bari, Meenakshi Banerjee puts a gold and pearl necklace on the idol before the Shashti evening puja
It was perhaps around this time that family rituals around Durga Puja began to take on their unique form. For instance, the first Bengali millionaires, Chhatu Babu and Latu Babu, were famous for their idol that was flanked by Jaya and Bijaya, instead of Lakshmi and Saraswati. In Pathuriaghata's Ghosh bari, the hilsa, mutton biryani and a sandal paste-infused kheer were the star attractions, as was their lobster dish known as Chingrimacher Chine Kebab, while the Basu Malliks of Potoldanga are still remembered for their famous gun salute to the goddess.
The Basu Malliks say that their founder patriarch Radhanath was perhaps one of the first Bengalis to learn English, and reportedly built 40 mansions before dying at the age 44. One of his grandsons, Kshetra Chandra Basu Mallick, started the Durga puja with the ritual of firing guns to announce the Sandhi Puja — the exact moment the 8th lunar day meets the 9th. It is at this moment, the Devi was said to have killed the Chanda and Munda forms of Asura, and was later venerated as Chamunda.
The Brahmin purohits have a separate room at the Narasingh Chandra Daw bari
The Brahmin purohits have a separate room at the Narasingh Chandra Daw bari
Says Srikanta Basu Mallik, a family member, "It is not known why this gun salute actually started, but even today everyone in the neighbourhood waits for us to fire the guns before starting the Nabami rituals." Interestingly, this clan does not offer any anna (rice) bhog to the goddess. In its place, is a sumptuous spread of all kinds of fried stuff and fritters with heaps of perfectly rounded luchis. This family also offers a symbolic bali (sacrifice) on the ninth lunar day, nabami. Earlier, it used to be a goat that was sacrificed, and its meat prepared as prasad. "After an unfortunate incident, the goat had to be replaced with a symbolic fruit — we use sugarcane now," Basu Mallik says.
The mutton bhog ritual, however, is still prevalent in other homes and is closer to the 'Jain mutton curry' — without onion and garlic. Fish is also offered in some homes, such as the Jagat Ram Mukherjee family mansion in Behala, that hosts an idol made of solid gold. In other homes, the naibedya, which is the key offering to the god or goddess who presides over the ceremonies of the day, takes on a sweeter note, as it happens in the Banerjee Bari at Patuatola Lane.
The 'Shri Gora' Meenakshi makes on Shashti after the morning puja rituals
The 'Shri Gora' Meenakshi makes on Shashti after the morning puja rituals
This elaborate spread is made of 108 mounds of sugar topped with narkoler naru (coconut laddoos), symmetrically placed on a massive brass thali. This pujo was started in 1890, by Beni Madhob Banerjee, the first Indian attorney. "Every year they are offered for the well being of all the children in the family," says Meenakshi Banerjee, a family member. On the day of Shashti, after the morning rituals are over, she sits down in a quiet corner to build a little colourful pyramid with rice paste in five colours — red, yellow, green, blue and black. It is called the "Sri Gora" and has its roots in folk lore.
The Daw family of Jorasanko, descendants of Shib Krishna Daw, who owned a successful mining business, takes pride in their impeccably maintained mansion, that has been the backdrop of many feature films and ads. Some of their rituals have been in practice for over 160 years. One of them involves the women of the house gathering after Mahalaya, to make soft, coconut-based sweets meant to last through the five days of the puja.
Narkoler nadu at Jorasanko Daw bari
Narkoler nadu at Jorasanko Daw bari
Given that a few hundreds are fed every day, the quantities are huge. Watching these women dressed in antique gold jewellery and the quintessential red-bordered silk saris, huddled around heaps of shaved coconut, rolling them into little balls, is a visual treat. The scene is a little different at the home of the descendants of Narasingh Chandra Daw, who have traded in spice and guns over centuries. They maintain a brightly painted thakur dalan with cast iron arches and slender pillars. The women don't prep the bhog themselves, but play an important part in overseeing the proceedings. Here too, the sweets are prepared every morning to be consumed through the day. There is a steady stream of relatives, friends, visitors and no one goes back empty handed.
History turns sweeter at the Roy Chowdhury's — their Sabarna Praanmohini being a signature sweet of the family. The Roy Chowdhurys are the ones who transferred their rights of Kalikata (later Calcutta) to the East India Company, altering the course of history forever. The family's first Durga Puja was held in 1610 and today, the family hosts eight pujas across their properties. There are 13 kinds of sweets and savouries that are unique to this family, but their star offering is the Praanmohini, a sweet dish made with parwal. One of the descendants, Devarshi Roy Chowdhury, says that the recipe dates back to 1850, when women would cook it and serve it on silverware to the goddess and then to the guests. It is a rich melange of parwal, ghee, milk raisins, cashew nuts, saffron and rose water, moistened in sugar syrup. Clearly, devised for a generation that had fewer health concerns.
Head to the Sovabajar Raj Bari and you'll find the grand old matriarch, Arati Deb, the busiest person at this time of the year. The septuagenarian hobbles from one end of the thakur dalan to another, participating in the prayers, chants and the readings of the scriptures. She also oversees the preps of the bhog, a stunning combination of sweet and savoury with samosas, motichoor laddoos and an assortment of deep fried sweets with a longish shelf life, on offer.
The five days of the Puja sees thousands of visitors stepping into the palace. The elegant white mansion with its brilliantly illuminated thakur dalan is still one of the finest in the city, as is the bhog that's prepared inside. There is very little in Kolkata that would do justice to its forgotten monicker — City of Palaces. But, Durga Puja is that magic wand that can transform even the most decrepit places into something mystical, alluring. And, what better way to go back in time than to bite into a piece of history.
Regal Pujo Eats
> At the Roy Chowdhury's, the Sabarna Praanmohini is a sweet made with parwal, ghee, saffron, rose water and sugar syrup
> The coconut-based sweets at the Daw family home in Jorasanko are a must-have
> The Sovabajar Raj Bari is known for its royal samosas and motichoor laddoos
> The hilsa and lobster dishes at Khelat Ghosh's mansion in Pathuriaghata are stuff of legend.

Source: http://www.mid-day.com/articles/kolkata-durga-pujo-mumbai-durga-puja/17672193

Saturday, October 8, 2016

Mughal era gunsmiths now struggling businessmen

Gunsmith Hafiz Fariduddin posing with an antique 12 bore gun made in England by acclaimed gunsmith Charles Lancaster. The gun is only one-of-its-kind in India, says Fariduddin. (Prabhakar Sharma/HT Photo)
Jaipur: Once celebrated Mughal era gunsmiths to present-day struggling gun dealers, this Rajasthan family can tell you in single breath how warfare and guns have evolved over the years.
But, now they regret how they are losing their gun-making skills in an effort to maintain themselves as gun dealers, thanks to the government restrictions on private gun manufacturing since 1961.
The ministry of home affairs is in the process of drafting the Arms Act Amendment Bill, which will allow open arms manufacturing to private firms again with some restrictions. So far, the manufacturing is limited to government ordnance factories and 92 licensed firms. The family has set their eyes on the amendment for achche din.
Royal assignments
Meet 65-year-old Hafiz Fariduddin, who can talk hours on how his ancestors got special assignments from wealthy Englishmen and royal families and how they lent special effects to rifles and revolvers to differentiate them from the common gun users. Their shop Bharat Armoury on the Motidoongri Road had been a favourite destination for gun lovers and buyers. But, now they contend with selling permitted guns and repairing the antique ones.
Earlier, Westley Richards 12 bore guns, Holland and Holland 12 bore guns, Webley revolver, Walther pistols, James Purdey 12 bore guns and Winchester Rifles did good business. However, now they are dealing in the ordnance factory stuff. The shop also has a licence to sale Nirbheek, the revolver which was launched exclusively for women after the Nirbhaya incident. But, it is yet to find customers in Jaipur, says Fariduddin.
Mughal era links
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Fariduddin’s eyes light up when he talks about his forefathers’ gunsmithing skills. “Our ancestors were part of a Mughal contingent that visited Rajasthan around 500 years ago. Since then our family had been engaged in the profession of making and repairing all types of firearms. My grandfather Bashiruddin was the head of the Royal Armoury in Rajasthan. Most of the weapons that one gets to look at the armoury of the City Palace and Jaigarh Fort, are made by our family,” he says.
His brother Mohammed Gayasuddin says till fifty years ago Bharat Armoury had a thriving business. The certificates from the royalty across India are now the only remnants of those days.
“We barely have any customers nowadays since there are only a handful of people who are interested in purchasing guns. Another factor which has affected our business is the complex formalities involved in getting a licence from the commissionerate. It often takes years to get a licence approved or renewed,” says Gayasuddin. He says the business has come down gradually. The monthly sales fetched them up Rs30000 before 2005. But, now the amount is merely Rs8000, he regrets, adding, “even a roadside vendor earns more than us. The only reason that we are still in this business is because this is our ancestral profession.” He partly relates the dip in the business to two additional district magistrates in Sriganganagar who were found guilty of issuing over 874 arms licences in 2005 -- most of them being illegal. “Later, the rules were made stricter and now it is almost impossible to get a gun licence if you are a common man.” However, he alleges many people from Jaipur are obtaining licences from dealers in Nagaland for illegal arms.
Young flight
However, Fariduddin says his craftsmen have the skill to repair old and antique guns, which cannot be repaired elsewhere. An antique 12 bore rifle made by legendary British gunsmith Charles Lancaster is one of them.
“The gun has a single trigger mechanism and there are not many people in the world that could repair such antique weapons. It is time consuming and it needs extreme caution,” Fariduddin says. The young generation Mohammed Izhar ( 22 ) and Mohammed Ayaz (20) are now diversifying into shooting sports besides carefully retaining the family skills.
Izhar has bagged silver and bronze medals at two shooting championships last year. He says that he wants to become a national-level shooter. “I will be taking part in the state championships which is scheduled in August this year.” Younger brother Ayaz too shares similar ambitions. They are committed to taking the family legacy further but didn’t sound too optimistic about the business.

Source: http://www.hindustantimes.com/jaipur/mughal-era-gunsmiths-now-struggling-businessmen/story-nvWPCSfLJRuwuanCLyPyON.html

Saturday, October 1, 2016

Jim Corbett’s 100-yr-old rifle returns home


Marc Newton, MD of a firm specialising in antique guns, and Samir Sinha of Corbett Tiger Reserve with Corbett’s gunMarc Newton, MD of a firm specialising in antique guns, and Samir Sinha of Corbett Tiger Reserve with Corbett’s gun
NAINITAL: A rifle once used by the legendary hunter-turned conservationist Jim Corbett was brought to Chhoti Haldwani, the village he set up, on Sunday by Marc Newton, managing director of John Rigby & Co, a London-based company specialising in antique guns.
Sameer Sinha, director of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) told TOI on Monday that the rifle had been able to come back to India after more than a year of sustained efforts. ''We are thankful to Marc for bringing the rifle back to the land where Jim Corbett lived and worked."


The rifle would be on display at the Corbett Tiger Reserve for the next 10 days.


Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Jim-Corbetts-100-yr-old-rifle-returns-home/articleshow/51691145.cms

Books

The Evolution of the Artillery in India: From the Battle of Plassey (1757) to the Revolt of 1857
By R. C. Butalia
Published by Allied Publishers, 1998
ISBN 8170238722, 9788170238720